Dyying of to do lists and cramps

cellardoorsandpetrichor said: Hello, friend! Come to New West and drink tea with me!

Yay! I would love to :) but I’m
Really really really busy right now. So probably not this week. Perhaps next week?

I close my eyes and seize it,
I clench my fists and beat it,
I light my torch and burn it;
I am the beast I worship.
Sylvia Plath (via coolfuneral)

So was it a Sylvia Plath quote before Deathgrips??

(Reblogged from crysta1queer)

(Source: gronkwena)

(Reblogged from andytemple)

There is nothing in life that I want more than to be a tattoo artist. And to feel love. That’s all. This is my internet prayer I hope cyberJebus hears me or something

sheer-powder:

“We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 
A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.
To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.
For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.
I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”
—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 


I really appreciate the sentiment expressed in this article, and as an Indian person myself I have to an extent experienced some of what the person is saying. I disagree though that only people of our culture should wear bindis and mehndi and the violence expressed in the sentence “I will rub that bindi off your head” is not appropriate given the situation. Mehndi does have ceremonial uses in Hindu culture but they are not religious or spiritual. At the end of the day it is a medium for body art. It has origins in Greece for gods sake and cultures from North Africa to Israel to India make use of it. And for the bindi, as a culture and as a people, the bindi has been appropriated by mainstream hippie culture since the 1960’s in North America. The bindi is both a symbol of religious/spiritual affiliation. But let’s face it. It’s also an accessory even to Indians who may feel very secular. I don’t feel comfortable judging wether or not someone is devoted enough to a religious doctrine or culture to accuse them of not being allowed to wear a bindi. As visible minorities I feelAs though in some situations mob mentality has taken over. I’m not concerned with policing other people’s beliefs and appearances when there are far bigger and more insidious issues at hand,

sheer-powder:

We’ve been ‘cool’ for a very long time, and in that sense our culture has been taken for a very long time. How do we define when we’ve arrived? It’s not when a young, white girl in Berkley is wearing nice garlands or those nice buddhist beads, or wearing bindi. I don’t feel like my life in anyway has been improved because she has the ability to do that and thinks that’s okay. My life hasn’t improved. The life of my mother has not improved. Our voice as a community within this economic system has not improved. 

A good friend of mine, she’s south Indian, and she grew up in Connecticut. Her mom would make her wear her bindi and go to school. She would get harassed by kids… she would be harassed so much that what she would do, is that because she was so ashamed to have that bindi on her head, she would leave her house, wipe it off… and then come home and put it back on.

To the point where a child would have to think about such a deliberate attempt to refute their own culture I think is pretty profound. If there’s a white girl wearing a bindi walking down central avenue in the heights, she’s not considered a dot head, even though she has a dot on her head.

For me, the feeling is disgust and anger. The way I look at it if I see it, I just get so mad because I think, how dare this person be able to wear that, or hold that, or put that statue in her house and not take any of the oppression for that. How dare they. That’s not fair. We have to take so much heat and repression for expressing ourselves.

I’m going to rip that thing off your head, and I’m going to scrub that mehndi off your hands, because you don’t have the right to wear it. Until the day when you walk in our shoes, and you face what we face… the pain, and the shame, and the hurt, and the fear, you don’t have the right to wear that. It is not your right, and you’re not worthy of it. I feel like it’s so superficial and it’s so disrespected. One day, wake up, be me, and then you’ll see how powerful what you’re wearing is. ”

—Raahi Reddy, Yellow Apparel: When the Coolie Becomes Cool 

I really appreciate the sentiment expressed in this article, and as an Indian person myself I have to an extent experienced some of what the person is saying. I disagree though that only people of our culture should wear bindis and mehndi and the violence expressed in the sentence “I will rub that bindi off your head” is not appropriate given the situation. Mehndi does have ceremonial uses in Hindu culture but they are not religious or spiritual. At the end of the day it is a medium for body art. It has origins in Greece for gods sake and cultures from North Africa to Israel to India make use of it. And for the bindi, as a culture and as a people, the bindi has been appropriated by mainstream hippie culture since the 1960’s in North America. The bindi is both a symbol of religious/spiritual affiliation. But let’s face it. It’s also an accessory even to Indians who may feel very secular. I don’t feel comfortable judging wether or not someone is devoted enough to a religious doctrine or culture to accuse them of not being allowed to wear a bindi. As visible minorities I feel
As though in some situations mob mentality has taken over. I’m not concerned with policing other people’s beliefs and appearances when there are far bigger and more insidious issues at hand,

(Reblogged from deathbeforedigital)

grumpapouts said: Ciara you just showed up on my dash!!! Would it be okay if I follow you?

You’re literally the third person today! Of course you can follow me, although be warned that if you go back in my blog far enough there’s a lot of anorexia/depression type self-loathing etc… So maybe don’t go there if it’s upsetting? But of course :)

Dying self-preservation
Ink
CIARA

tashabilities:

whahadhappenwas:

iwriteaboutfeminism:

Police continue to make arrests at Ferguson protest.

Part 4.

UNCHECKED! No state or federal intervention at all!

You telling me NOBODY in this country has the authority to put an end to this?

Nobody has the power to dismantle this oppressive police force who has consistently violated the civil rights of these Black people publicly for an entire month?

Fuck everything!

Dat bold. 

Like, why the fuck is this STILL going on? 

WHY has everybody harboring Darren Wilson not also been brought up on fucking charges? 

(Reblogged from creepingfeminism)